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China to Lift Ban on U.S. Beef


Following a 13-year ban on U.S. beef exports to China, an announcement from the Chinese Government indicates they will begin accepting U.S. beef from animals under 30 months of age.

“This is great news for U.S. beef producers,” said Kent Bacus, director of international trade for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “While these initial reports are positive, we must continue technical negotiations and undergo the process of formally approving export certificates. China is already the world’s second largest buyer of beef, and with a growing middle class, the export opportunities for U.S. cattlemen and women are tremendous.”

The next step is for United States Department of Agriculture officials to work with China’s Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine to approve the certificates and protocols for exports.

“Our cattle producers are the best in the world at producing high quality beef,” said Bacus. “To continue to grow demand for our product, our industry relies on fair trade based on sound science. This latest announcement by China is welcome news and further highlights the benefits of trade in the Pacific, opportunities that will only be expanded by passage of the Trans Pacific Partnership.”

Source: National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

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