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China, U.S. Swine Industries Gather to Address African Swine Fever


Despite ongoing trade challenges between their two countries, members of the swine industries in the United States and China gathered in mid-January to seek possible solutions for the growing number of African swine fever outbreaks in China.

The 7th U.S.-China Swine Industry Symposium, held earlier this month, was co-organized by the U.S. Grains Council (USCG) and the U.S. Meat Export Federation, along with others. Roughly 200 industry professionals gathered in Beijing for the event that focused on animal disease prevention.

The swine industries in China and the United States are closely connected through trade in meat and feed products, and issues that affect the two industries have significant implications for global markets, according to USGC.

Bryan Lohman of USGC, referring to diseases such as African swine fever, says, “Fortunately, a large share of China’s pork production comes from modern operations with strict biosecurity protocols, and that will help spare much of China’s production.” He adds that learning more about the disease will help in expanding biosecurity measures to contain the outbreak for the global pork industry over the next few years.

Source: AgriMarketing

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