News

Air Emission Reporting Date Delayed to January 22, 2018


The DC Circuit Court of Appeals has extended the deadline for farmers to report air releases of hazardous substances from animal waste at livestock operations until Jan. 22, 2018.  The decision postponed the effective date of the Court’s April 2017 decision vacating an EPA rule that exempted these farms from certain statutory reporting obligations.

“EPA is committed to providing America’s farmers and ranchers – people committed to conserving the land and the environment- the clarity needed in meeting their reporting obligations required by law,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt.

Timeline

On April 11, 2017, the DC Circuit Court vacated an EPA rule finalized on Dec. 18, 2008, that exempted most farms from certain release reporting requirements in two statutes, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA).

In response to a request from the Trump Administration EPA, the DC Circuit Court extended the effective date of its decision to vacate the 2008 rule to Nov. 15, 2017.  In response to a second request from EPA, the DC Circuit Court further extended that date to Jan. 22, 2018.

EPA has prepared guidance that includes links to resources that farmers can consider when calculating emissions for specific species of livestock.

To view EPA’s guidance and Frequently Asked Questions on reporting air emissions from animal waste:  https://www.epa.gov/epcra/cercla-and-epcra-reporting-requirements-air-releases-hazardous-substances-animal-waste-farms

Source: Delta Farm Press

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